The United States - The Great Lakes

Lake Superior:
Lake Superior is the largest in volume of the Great Lakes. It is the coldest and deepest. The average depth is 483 feet.

Lake Michigan:
Lake Michigan is the second largest in volume of the Great Lakes. It is the only Great Lake that is entirely in the United States. It contains the Milwaukee and Chicago metropolitan areas. The average depth is 279 feet.

Lake Huron:
Lake Huron is the third largest in volume of the Great Lakes. It contains the Saginaw-Bay City and Flint metropolitan areas. The average depth is 195 feet.

Lake Erie:
Lake Erie is the smallest in volume of the Great Lakes. It is the shallowest of the Great Lakes with an average depth of only 62 feet. The lake gets runoff from Ontario, Ohio, Indiana and Michigan.

Lake Ontario:
Lake Ontario is slightly smaller in area than Lake Erie but the average depth is much deeper with an average depth of 283 feet. It has Toronto and Hamilton on its shore.



The Great Salt Lake:
The Great Salt Lake is the largest salt lake in the western hemisphere and the largest lake between the Great Lakes and the Pacific Ocean. There are no streams that empty from the lake which contributes, along with water evaporation, to the high salinity.









The American Patriot's Almanac


The American Patriot's Almanac: Daily Readings on America (Hardcover) by William J. Bennett (Author) and John Cribb (Author)